Brief Biographies of Jane Adams and D. Gorton

D. GORTON is a photographer from Greenville, Mississippi. He joined SNCC, the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, in1963, while at Ole Miss. He later went on to the Philadelphia Inquirer as Chief Photographer. He joined the New York Times and was transferred to the White House beat where he photographed the Carter and Reagan administrations. He was a senior editor in "A Day in the Life of the Soviet Union", "special" photographer for films such as "Glory", "A River Runs Through It", "Eight Men Out" and "Fried Green Tomatoes", and worked for Sony, Warner Bros,. and other music companies on albums. He is currently involved in photographing the "social landscape of agriculture: cotton, tobacco and corn."

J
ANE ADAMS is a professor of Anthropology and of History at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. She grew up on a farm in southern Illinois, participated in the civil rights movement in Carbondale and as a Freedom Summer Volunteer in 1964, staying in Mississippi through 1965. She spent the rest of the decade in the anti-Vietnam war movement, returning to school in the 1970s. Her research focuses on the transformation of rural society, particularly in the United States. She is author of The Transformation of Rural Life: Southern Illinois 1890-1990, and editor of "All Anybody Ever Wanted of Me Was to Work:" The Memoirs of Edith Bradley Rendleman, and Fighting For the Farm: Rural America Transformed, in addition to numerous articles.